News

Coverage Losses by State for the Senate Health Care Repeal Bill

by Emily Gee

06.27.17   The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has released its score of the Senate's health care repeal plan, showing that the bill would eliminate coverage for 15 million Americans next year and for 22 million by 2026. The CBO projects that the Senate bill would slash Medicaid funding by $772 billion over the next decade; increase individual market premiums by 20 percent next year; and make comprehensive coverage "extremely expensive" in some markets. The score, released by Congress' nonpartisan budge… Continue Reading


The Senate's New Health Care Bill Makes It More Expensive to Be a Woman

by Alicia Adamczyk

06.23.17   The Better Care Reconciliation Act, introduced Thursday by Senate Republicans to replace the Affordable Care Act, would both increase pregnancy costs for women, and increase the cost of not getting pregnant. How does the bill manage such a feat? It defunds Planned Parenthood-which provides family planning and birth control for millions of low income women for one year. It also prohibits federal tax subsidies from paying for individual market plans that cover abortion. That means fewer women wil… Continue Reading


Senate health-care draft repeals Obamacare taxes, provides bigger subsidies for low-income Americans than House bill

by Paige Winfield Cunningham

06.21.17   Senate leaders on Wednesday were putting the final touches on legislation that would reshape a big piece of the U.S. health-care system by dramatically rolling back Medicaid while easing the impact on Americans who stand to lose coverage under a new bill. A discussion draft circulating Wednesday afternoon among aides and lobbyists would roll back the Affordable Care Act's taxes, phase down its Medicaid expansion, rejigger its subsidies, give states wider latitude in opting out of its regulation… Continue Reading


Senate Repeal Bill Would Still Eviscerate Coverage and Protections for People with Pre-Existing Conditions

by Thomas Huelskoetter

06.09.17   Recent reports indicate that the emerging Senate version of the American Health Care Act (AHCA) may not include the House version's provision permitting states to waive the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) community rating provision, which prevents insurers from charging sick people higher premiums than healthy people. Even without community rating waivers, the Senate bill would still critically weaken protections for people with pre-existing conditions. By allowing states to waive the ACA's essenti… Continue Reading


School Suspensions, Test Scores, and Lead Poisoning

by Rachel M. Cohen

06.09.17   Over the past several years, education advocates and civil rights groups have been sounding the alarm on the harms of exclusionary school discipline policies. Critics say these punishments-suspensions, expulsions, and school-based arrests-are increasingly doled out for minor infractions, and disproportionately given to students of color. A National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) working paper published in May adds a new wrinkle to the debate on disparities in school discipline: Economists f… Continue Reading


Rural Florida Hit Hardest By Trump Medicaid Cuts

by Jim Ash

06.08.17   President Donald Trump's plan to slash billions of dollars from Medicaid would hit small town America hardest, especially in Florida, according to a new Georgetown study. The report shows 57 percent of Florida's rural and small-town children receive health insurance through Medicaid versus 44 percent of their urban counterparts. Researcher Joan Alker says the numbers should correct any misconceptions of Medicaid as a big-city program. "What's so I think eye-popping about this research is ju… Continue Reading


N.J. bill for Medicaid would soar by $810M under Trump Obamacare repeal

by Jonathan D. Salant

06.07.17   WASHINGTON -- New Jersey taxpayers would have to pay an extra $810 million to cover the 560,000 residents now receiving health care under the Medicaid expansion that the House Republican legislation would repeal, according to a new study. That would increase the state's costs by 227 percent in 2021 over current levels, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a progressive research group in Washington. Should the state not pick up the extra costs, about 374,000 New Jerseyans wo… Continue Reading


Repealing Medicaid expansion could hit Colorado budget especially hard, study finds

by John Ingold

06.06.17   Colorado could be on the hook for spending close to $700 million more per year by 2023 if the federal government does away with its enhanced contribution to the Medicaid expansion, according to a new reportreleased Tuesday. The report, from the left-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, found that Colorado could be one of the states most impacted by the repeal of Medicaid expansion that is proposed in the U.S. House of Representative's version of the GOP health care bill. That's becau… Continue Reading


Wisconsin Family Stays Together With Help From Medicaid

by Alison Kodjak

06.05.17   Nancy and Dan Gapinski of Glendale, Wis., remember a time when they couldn't really communicate with their own son. "He used to not really have any kinds of conversations with us. He did a lot of echoing things that we said, and scripting from movies," Nancy Gapinski says as she and her husband wait for their son Ben's school bus to arrive. "A lot of times kids didn't know how to respond to him then, and didn't know what he was trying to say and conversations wouldn't really go anywhere." But … Continue Reading


It's been 10 years since Congress raised the minimum wage

by Julia Horowitz

05.25.17   Congress hasn't raised the federal minimum wage in 10 years. Democrats on Capitol Hill decided to mark the occasion by introducing a bill that probably won't pass. On Thursday, Congressional Democrats, with the support of Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, introduced legislation that would raise the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $15 an hour by 2024. "If you work 40 hours a week or 50 hours a week, you should not be living in poverty," Sen. Berni… Continue Reading


Democrats just united on a $15-an-hour minimum wage

by Noah Kulwin

05.25.17   Bruised after a crushing defeat in November, Democrats are uniting under a cause they believe could pay off in 2018: the $15 federal minimum wage. On Thursday, Senate Democrats introduced legislation that would raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024, reflecting local laws that have raised the minimum wage in 19 states earlier this year. The federal minimum wage has been $7.25 an hour since taking effect in July 2009, an eight-year stagnation that evinces the broader trend of stalled wage… Continue Reading


Sanders, Democrats introduce $15 minimum wage bill

by Jordain Carney

05.25.17   Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) is teaming up with top congressional Democrats to try to raise the federal minimum wage to $15, a move that has divided Democrats for years. Sanders, Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.), Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) - the top Democrat on the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee - and 28 other Democratic senators introduced the Senate legislation on Thursday. The bill would increase the federal minimum wage, currently at $7.25, to $15 by 2024, a… Continue Reading


Congressional Democrats rally around Sanders' minimum wage proposal

by Drew Angerer

05.25.17   Top Democrats joined Sen. Bernie Sanders, D-Vermont, on Thursday to introduce the party's latest economic proposal: raising the federal minimum wage to $15 by 2024 and indexing it over time. "I think under any definition that is a starvation wage," Sanders said. "We have got to raise the minimum wage to a living wage. And what we are here today to say is that living wage is $15 an hour." Senate Minority leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority leader Nancy Pelosi. Others included co-sponsor… Continue Reading


Ben Carson Says Poverty Is Largely ‘a State of Mind’

by Eric Levitz

05.24.17   Ben Carson announced Wednesday that poverty is a state of mind. "I think poverty to a large extent is also a state of mind," the Housing secretary said during an interview with Armstrong Williams on SiriusXM. "You take somebody that has the right mindset, you can take everything from them and put them on the street and I guarantee in a little while they'll be right back up there." This is incredible news for the 16 million American households that suffer from food insecurity, or the hundreds o… Continue Reading


Trump’s budget would cut off food for poor people if they have too many kids

by Caitlin Dewey

05.24.17   The Trump administration is seeking to dramatically cut food aid to large American families as part of its wide-ranging budget proposal to shrink the social safety net, Agriculture Department officials said Tuesday. The measure is a small part of the administration's radical plan to cut the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), better known as food stamps, by $193 billion over 10 years. The plan would slash the number of people who rely on the SNAP program, which covers 44 million p… Continue Reading


Trump’s Education Budget Takes Aim at the Working Class

by Alia Wong

05.22.17   Many of the spending goals outlined in Donald Trump's proposed education budget reflect his campaign rhetoric. The president, who has long called for reducing the federal government's role in schools and universities, wants to cut the Education Department's funding by $9 billion, or 13 percent of the budget approved by Congress last month. The few areas that would see a boost pertain to school choice, an idea that Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos have repeatedly touted as a top priority… Continue Reading


Trump’s Budget Cuts Deeply Into Medicaid and Anti-Poverty Efforts

by Julie Hirschfeld Davis

05.22.17   WASHINGTON - President Trump plans to unveil on Tuesday a $4.1 trillion budget for 2018 that would cut deeply into programs for the poor, from health care and food stamps to student loans and disability payments, laying out an austere vision for reordering the nation's priorities. The document, grandly titled "A New Foundation for American Greatness," encapsulates much of the "America first" message that powered Mr. Trump's campaign. It calls for an increase in military spending of 10 percent a… Continue Reading


Lessons From The Nation's Oldest Voucher Program

by Claudio Sanchez

05.19.17   Milwaukee has the nation's longest-running publicly funded voucher program. For 27 years it has targeted African-American kids from low-income families, children who otherwise could not afford the tuition at a private or religious school. The vouchers are issued by what's known as the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program. Some people see them as a beacon of hope in a public school district where student achievement lags far behind the state average and where only 20 percent of students are profic… Continue Reading


How Kids Would Fare Under the American Health Care Act

by Vann Newkirk II

05.18.17   Since the American Health Care Act's passage in the House, the future of U.S. health policy now rests in the hands of the Senate. What happens next is unclear: The Senate's version of the legislation could move to the left or right, or the chamber could draft an entirely new bill as a starting place. Still, the broad strokes of Republican health-care reform-a repeal of insurance mandates under the Affordable Care Act, massive cuts to long-term Medicaid spending, federal grants for state high-ris… Continue Reading


Republicans serve up dishonest claims to defend their health-care bill

by Editorial Board

05.08.17   SEN. SUSAN COLLINS (R-Maine) was asked Sunday whether the health-care bill the House of Representatives passed last week would, as its GOP boosters insist, improve coverage and preserve patient protections. "I think that's unlikely," she responded. "Unlikely" was a kind way of putting it. Ms. Collins's comments came on the same morning that Trump administration officials and House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) made several indefensible claims about the bill they championed, despite widespread co… Continue Reading

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